Using VITAL RECORDS to Researching AROUND the Missing 1890 Census in Genealogy

Using VITAL RECORDS to Researching AROUND  the Missing 1890 Census in Genealogy



How do you research around the 1890 US Census loss? Try using vital records to aid genealogical research. Devon Noel Lee handles Part 4 of our 8 Part collaboration with Lisa Lisson from Are You My Cousin?

Vital records are terrific alternatives to the 1890 Census records and perfect level one genealogy records for beginning genealogists to access. But, you’ll find clues in the 1880 and 1900 census to help you research this record type.

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RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THIS VIDEO:
1900 US Census

Family Search – https://www.familysearch.org/search/collection/1325221
MyHeritage –
https://www.myheritage.com/research/collection-10131/1900-united-states-federal-census
FindMyPast
https://www.findmypast.com/articles/world-records/full-list-of-united-states-records/census-land-and-substitutes/us-census-1900
Ancestry
https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=7602

Burned Counties
https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Burned_Counties_Research

Iowa Marriage Records
https://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=8823
Illinois State Archives
http://www.cyberdriveillinois.com/departments/archives/

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ADDITIONAL READING:

The 1890 Census Fragments

31 Days of “Out of the Box” Genealogy Tips – The 1890 Census Fragments

The 1890 Census – How To Research the “Genealogy Black Hole” Part 1

The 1890 Census – How To Research the “Genealogy Black Hole” Part 1

The 1890 Census – Researching AROUND the “Genealogy Black Hole” – Part 2

The 1890 Census – Researching AROUND the “Genealogy Black Hole” – Part 2

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SUPPORT LISA LISSON, of Are You My Cousin?
Blog: https://lisalisson.com
FREEBIE: 5 Things You CAN Do If You Cannot Find Your Ancestors in Census Records
https://app.convertkit.com/landing_pages/188015?v=6
Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1140978859371755/

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2 Comments

  1. Some states have a 1885 and 1895 state census, and those help somewhat to fill the gap. Also findagrave has some burial records of children who lived and died during the gap.

  2. My biggest strategy is the use of obituaries. I get a good idea of at least the names if not general dates (some will say infant daughter so I can ball park the time range then.) But by far my favorite piece of information on the 1900 (and 1910) census is the number of born and living children. And it isn't just the obvious mothers they asked that. I found out what time frame to look for an aunt's death because in the 1910 census her mother listed 3/2. I wouldn't have thought to look for her daughter's death because I have a family bible that showed her marriage (and subsequent move out of state) but not her death and I would not have looked for it so soon. She had only been married for a year or two at the time of her death. I actually wish Ancestry would pull that information out when linking those two censuses to a tree. Another grandmother had five children before 1900 and only three were living, and one of those passed before the next census. I may never find those other two children's names but at least I know they existed and about when they lived.

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